MinneCulture

MinneCulture programs are part of KFAI's Legacy Project, which highlights Minnesota arts, culture, history and the environment. MinneCulture airs every Monday and Wednesday evening, from 7:30 to 8pm. The program features short stories from our 10,000 Fresh Voices series, documentaries, and performances recorded for Live from Minnesota.

KFAI is part of the AMPERS/IPR network (Association of Minnesota Public Educational Radio Stations/Independent Public Radio).

All MinneCulture programs are uploaded to ampers.org.

Funding for MinneCulture comes from KFAI listeners, and the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.


Recent Playlists

4/24/2013 MinneCulture
4/22/2013 MinneCulture
4/17/2013 MinneCulture

This week on MinneCulture, Live from Minnesota goes to the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis for its Short Shorts Salon. In this special event recognizing local writers, authors read original short works, ranging from 100- to 800-word pieces. Featuring Bill Nemers (The Learning Process), Kris Krueger (Dirty Dishes), Tom Kendrich (Birch), Sasha Porter (The Engineer and the Artist Series: The Golden Gate Bridge), Susan Gray (The Drama of Others), Bart Gailey (Nana Bozo), Jeff Johnson (Thrown) Mary McCreavy (Simple Predicate), Casey Cook (Here Again), Luke Anderson (Farm Hand), Samuel Kohl (As Was I), and Katrina Woullet (Closer to Space: The Flight Away from 3320 Lynn Street).

4/15/2013 MinneCulture

This week on MinneCulture, Live from Minnesota goes to the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis for its Short Shorts Salon. In this special event recognizing local writers, authors read original short works, ranging from 100- to 800-word pieces. Featuring Bill Nemers (The Learning Process), Kris Krueger (Dirty Dishes), Tom Kendrich (Birch), Sasha Porter (The Engineer and the Artist Series: The Golden Gate Bridge), Susan Gray (The Drama of Others), Bart Gailey (Nana Bozo), Jeff Johnson (Thrown) Mary McCreavy (Simple Predicate), Casey Cook (Here Again), Luke Anderson (Farm Hand), Samuel Kohl (As Was I), and Katrina Woullet (Closer to Space: The Flight Away from 3320 Lynn Street).

4/10/2013 MinneCulture

Tonight on MinneCulture, a special pledge drive encore presentation that explores the history of KFAI, Fresh Air Inc. This documentary was produced by Ahndi Fridell and J. Otis Powell in 2003 for KFAI’s 25th anniversary, and this year, a companion piece is in the works to celebrate the station’s 35th birthday. Tonight we’ll take a look back at the evolution of KFAI community radio in the second of a two-part series.

4/8/2013 MinneCulture

Tonight on MinneCulture, a special pledge drive encore presentation that explores the history of KFAI, Fresh Air Inc. This documentary was produced by Ahndi Fridell and J. Otis Powell in 2003 for KFAI’s 25th anniversary, and this year, a companion piece is in the works to celebrate the station’s 35th birthday. Tonight we’ll take a look back at the evolution of KFAI community radio in the first of a two-part series.

4/3/2013 MinneCulture

Every weekend during summer, vacationers from all over Minnesota and beyond pack up the family car and head north to Highway 1. The highway cuts a jagged route across the top quarter of the state, from North Dakota in the west, to the rocky shores of Lake Superior in the east, through farmland, reservation, lake and lodge country. KAXE producer. Curious about this storied Northlands highway, KAXE producer Britt Aamodt hit the road to explore for herself.

4/1/2013 MinneCulture

Every weekend during summer, vacationers from all over Minnesota and beyond pack up the family car and head north to Highway 1. The highway cuts a jagged route across the top quarter of the state, from North Dakota in the west, to the rocky shores of Lake Superior in the east, through farmland, reservation, lake and lodge country. KAXE producer. Curious about this storied Northlands highway, KAXE producer Britt Aamodt hit the road to explore for herself.

3/27/2013 MinneCulture

Two diverse faiths: Minnesota’s Mindekirken and Tibetan Buddhism
Produced by Jessica Folker

Religion and language shape culture, so for immigrants coming to the United States, foreign tongues and unfamiliar worship services can be daunting. This audio documentary explores two religious communities in Minneapolis: the Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, or Mindekirken, and Tibetan Buddhists at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery. Mindekirken is one of only two churches in the United States where Norwegian is the main language of worship. Founded 90 years ago in the Phillips neighborhood, the church has reinvented itself multiple times as the number of Norwegian immigrants to the Twin Cities has slowed to a trickle. But still the church draws worshipers—close to one hundred—many second, third and fourth generation Norwegian-Americans. Across town, young Tibetans at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery and the Tibetan Community Center talk about keeping religious traditions alive while living in exile. Tibetans began arriving in the Minnesota in the 1990s, and today the Twin Cities has the second largest Tibetan population in the United States. Young adults explain what Buddhism means to them, how it’s different than their parents’ religion, and what the future holds for the next generation being raised as Tibetan, Buddhist and Minnesotan.

3/25/2013 MinneCulture

Two diverse faiths: Minnesota’s Mindekirken and Tibetan Buddhism
Produced by Jessica Folker

Religion and language shape culture, so for immigrants coming to the United States, foreign tongues and unfamiliar worship services can be daunting. This audio documentary explores two religious communities in Minneapolis: the Norwegian Lutheran Memorial Church, or Mindekirken, and Tibetan Buddhists at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery. Mindekirken is one of only two churches in the United States where Norwegian is the main language of worship. Founded 90 years ago in the Phillips neighborhood, the church has reinvented itself multiple times as the number of Norwegian immigrants to the Twin Cities has slowed to a trickle. But still the church draws worshipers—close to one hundred—many second, third and fourth generation Norwegian-Americans. Across town, young Tibetans at the Gyuto Wheel of Dharma Monastery and the Tibetan Community Center talk about keeping religious traditions alive while living in exile. Tibetans began arriving in the Minnesota in the 1990s, and today the Twin Cities has the second largest Tibetan population in the United States. Young adults explain what Buddhism means to them, how it’s different than their parents’ religion, and what the future holds for the next generation being raised as Tibetan, Buddhist and Minnesotan.